Writing

The Writer’s Post: “Famous Author’s Writing Process,” (Part I)

beverage-blue-breakfast-414551Many of us try to mimic the authors who inspire us in style, story ideas, and characters. But do we know their entire process of creating the worlds and stories we love? Though I encourage you to find your own routine and process of creating your work, here are classic authors and their own methods in creating literature.

 

  • MARK TWAIN

Twain had a study on his farm, on in which no one could enter and had to blow a horn to summon him from his stupor for dinner. Using “brickbats” to weigh down papers, he opened his study up in summer or on windy days to cool off. He would write all day then read his writings of that day to his family to which he recieved their praise.

 

  • C.S. LEWIS

His routine was the most ideal form of writing routines we could hope for. He would have breakfast at 8am and was at his writing desk by 9. He would write until his lunch at 1. After a lunch, he would walk for 2 hours before returning to his desk to read and write until 7:00pm and getting to bed no later than 11. Sounds like an excellent way to spend the weekend!

 

  • JANE AUSTEN

Austen would write beside the light of a window on a small walnut table armed with ink and a pen. She woke every morning before her family to play piano before making breakfast for everyone. Talk about a productive morning! Austen would follow this up and write all day until dinner and read that day’s writing aloud to her family.

 

  • JAMES JOYCE

After waking up around 10am every morning, Joyce claimed laying on his stomach was beneficial to writing. He also used crayons to see his writing clearly and wore a white suit as a light source to reflect off the paper.

 

  • SCOTT FITZGERALD

The author of The Great Gatsby would rise late around 11am and spend the afternoon prepping for a writing session. This proves you need not be a morning person to achieve a stroke of genius.

 

These techniques are nothing to hold true to if they do not work for you.  Find your own writing schedule that fits into your daily routines, and I mean daily, and keep writing. Writers before us had their own writing methods of bringing about their work into this world while juggling their own personal life, faced with the same mountainous climb to recognition, so what is stopping you?

Keep writing!

Writing

The Writer’s Post: The Voices in Your Head

Ever roll your eyes when another writer says: “oh, I had to have that in the book because [name of their character] told me to”? Well, next time believe them.

I know, I know. You must think: ‘Cassandra? You are defending these people when they believe their imaginary friends are talking with them? They might even talk to them out loud!” Oh, the humanity! Really? Is this the worst thing these people could do?

Sit down before you continue reading.

Writers are talking to someone. They aren’t crazy and the characters aren’t fictional. The voice inside the writer’s head is themselves. As we go about our lives, we are influenced by the people and places within it. Writers are delving into a memory, emotion, or a person they knew in the past when they conjure up an idea of a character, it is not “from scratch”. We can never have an original thought, thoughts and ideas will always have their origin. So no, the people they make aren’t enterily fictional. How else can the characters evoke emotion from the readers if they do not come from another human’s heart and personality?

Ever felt a personal connection with a computer? Exactly.

Emotions are the building blocks a writer uses to understand what type personality and backstory a character will have. For example, a stern side of a writer’s personality can inform the creation of a paternal character. “Speaking” to this fragment of themselves is all part of the process in forming believable characters that readers, people who were never inside the writer’s head, connect with. It is through the writer’s humanity that makes it possible for readers to feel connected to their fabrications from real-life experience and exploration, while we can’t connect with the experiences of a hair brush. A high school character can connect the writer and reader through their own experiences during the dreaded teenage world of angst and emo bands.

In conclusion, writers do hear voices in their heads, voices from emotions that are very real. Writers follow that emotion to form a person, give them a goal readers can find reasonable- no they can’t be evil just to be evil. Without a true understanding between the audience and characters, the reader won’t care if they live or die.

Writers: The voice in your head, or as we like to say: “the character’s voice”, is your own emotions and experience with your own life story leading you in your writing. Sometimes you will deviate from what you originally planned and form your story into something almost unrecognizable (I have been through this many times). It is all part of being a human and having the emotional capacity to create worlds and stories. Go with your instincts, it is you advising yourself anyways under the guise of a character.

Keep striving, growing, and learning. And never EVER stop writing!pexels-photo-799420.jpeg